oupacademic:


A much thornier question concerns the history of Engl. stun. Old English had the verb stunian “crash, resound, roar; impinge; dash.” It looks like a perfect etymon of stun. Skeat thought so at the beginning of his etymological career and never changed his opinion. He compared stunian with a group of words meaning “to groan”: Icelandic stynja, Dutch stenen, German stöhnen, and their cognates elsewhere. Those are almost certainly related to thunder. Apparently, the congeners of tonare did not always denote a great amount of din.

Anatoly Liberman examines the etymology of ‘stun’ as illustrated by Thor, god of thunder, summoning his energy to grasp s mobile. 
GIF via thor-lover-of-poppingtarts

oupacademic:

A much thornier question concerns the history of Engl. stun. Old English had the verb stunian “crash, resound, roar; impinge; dash.” It looks like a perfect etymon of stun. Skeat thought so at the beginning of his etymological career and never changed his opinion. He compared stunian with a group of words meaning “to groan”: Icelandic stynja, Dutch stenen, German stöhnen, and their cognates elsewhere. Those are almost certainly related to thunder. Apparently, the congeners of tonare did not always denote a great amount of din.

Anatoly Liberman examines the etymology of ‘stun’ as illustrated by Thor, god of thunder, summoning his energy to grasp s mobile

GIF via thor-lover-of-poppingtarts

Originally from Oxford Academic (Oxford University Press) Tumblr